Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 25

Thread: Cavaliers and their Serious Problem with Periodontal Diseases.

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Hartlepool UK
    Posts
    653
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Some of the breeds with the worst teeth are poodles, papillons , yorkies etc & all are known for being long lived

    Cleaning their teeth is good for their overall health but I dont think it will stop mvd

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    1,592
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    15

    Default Cavaliers and Their Serious Problems with Periodontal Disease

    Quote Originally Posted by AT View Post
    Some of the breeds with the worst teeth are poodles, papillons , yorkies etc & all are known for being long lived

    Cleaning their teeth is good for their overall health but I dont think it will stop mvd

    Cavaliers and Their Serious Problems with Periodontal Disease

    I am glad this Thread is now being discussed

    It was mentioned in a Post about some other Breeds of Dogs having bad Teeth ,but no Heart problems.

    When you think about it ,what other Breeds have a Predisposition to Heart Trouble like the Cavalier Breed,and has been stated by Cardiologists ,that no other Toy Breed has such early onset of MVD than what the Cavalier Breed has.

    Now it is a fact that Bad Teeth cause Bacterial Problems and this gets into the Blood- Stream and can attack different Organs in the Body,so if the Cavaliers have a Predisposition to Bad Hearts ,could that not be the first place that could be being attacked.

    I just don't know, but this subject is now being considered by Cardiologists.

    The more you think about it ,the more it could be making sense.

    Bet
    Bet (Hargreaves)

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    1,592
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    15

    Default Cavaliers and Their Serious Problems with Periodontal Diseases

    Quote Originally Posted by Bet View Post
    Cavaliers and Their Serious Problems with Periodontal Disease

    I am glad this Thread is now being discussed

    It was mentioned in a Post about some other Breeds of Dogs having bad Teeth ,but no Heart problems.

    When you think about it ,what other Breeds have a Predisposition to Heart Trouble like the Cavalier Breed,and has been stated by Cardiologists ,that no other Toy Breed has such early onset of MVD than what the Cavalier Breed has.

    Now it is a fact that Bad Teeth cause Bacterial Problems and this gets into the Blood- Stream and can attack different Organs in the Body,so if the Cavaliers have a Predisposition to Bad Hearts ,could that not be the first place that could be being attacked.

    I just don't know, but this subject is now being considered by Cardiologists.

    The more you think about it ,the more it could be making sense.

    Bet


    If I could pass on this further information while it's still fresh in my mind.

    Here in Britain there was Heart Seminar held ,1995, where it was mentioned that there was a Proven Link between Cavaliers and Endocarditis, the question was asked at the Seminar about Teeth Problems and Endocarditis and it was confirmed , yes there is a Link.

    Some-body had asked as to whether Cavaliers were prone to having Teeth Problems, and again the answer was yes.

    It is known that Endocarditis can affect the Heart Valves,this Seminar was 15 years ago.

    Eddy has also mentioned this Link between Heart Valves and Endocarditis ,and MVD is to do Heart Valves.

    I just wonder whether a Survey should be carried out to discover how many Cavaliers who have Bad Teeth are suffering from a Heart condition.

    Just a Thought.

    Bet
    Bet (Hargreaves)

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Sale, Victoria, Australia
    Posts
    281
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Bet I tend to think of endocarditis from periodontal disease as another completely different problem and a problem to be avoided. Bacterial endocarditis could possibly be a really serious heart situation on its own and could possibly be life threatening within days. Well I wouldn't want such a problem on top of another heart problem be it MVD or whatever.

    I also mentioned that bacteria could also travel via the blood to organs throughout the body and even to the brain, and in a number of locations throughout the body infections might also establish. With that in mind I'll change to something else instead of the heart.

    Meningitis is inflammation of the protective membranes covering the brain and spinal cord, known collectively as the meninges. The inflammation may be caused by infection with viruses, bacteria, or other microorganisms, and less commonly by certain drugs. Meningitis can be life-threatening because of the inflammation's proximity to the brain and spinal cord; therefore the condition is classified as serious and a medical emergency. If I had heritable SM with syrinxes I certainly would not want yet another problem such as Meningitis or Arachnoiditis on top of my heritable SM problem.

    Maybe next we could discuss organs such as the liver or kidneys, and if we already had a problem with those we wouldn't want yet another problem in those organs, not even from microorganisms in the blood which might have originated from a mouth problem in a periodontal disease.
    .

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    1,592
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    15

    Default Cavaliers and Their Serious Problems with Periodontal Diseases.

    Quote Originally Posted by EddyAnne View Post
    Bet I tend to think of endocarditis from periodontal disease as another completely different problem and a problem to be avoided. Bacterial endocarditis could possibly be a really serious heart situation on its own and could possibly be life threatening within days. Well I wouldn't want such a problem on top of another heart problem be it MVD or whatever.

    I also mentioned that bacteria could also travel via the blood to organs throughout the body and even to the brain, and in a number of locations throughout the body infections might also establish. With that in mind I'll change to something else instead of the heart.

    Meningitis is inflammation of the protective membranes covering the brain and spinal cord, known collectively as the meninges. The inflammation may be caused by infection with viruses, bacteria, or other microorganisms, and less commonly by certain drugs. Meningitis can be life-threatening because of the inflammation's proximity to the brain and spinal cord; therefore the condition is classified as serious and a medical emergency. If I had heritable SM with syrinxes I certainly would not want yet another problem such as Meningitis or Arachnoiditis on top of my heritable SM problem.

    Maybe next we could discuss organs such as the liver or kidneys, and if we already had a problem with those we wouldn't want yet another problem in those organs, not even from microorganisms in the blood which might have originated from a mouth problem in a periodontal disease.
    .

    Cavaliers and Their Serious Problems with Periodontal Diseases.


    Eddy,

    I am just waiting to see what happens about all this, the Cardiologists are having a think about it.

    So that is all that can be done at the moment.

    I have just passed on Professor Larry Glickman's advice and Information from his Private E-Mail to me ,to a Research Cavalier Cardiologist ,so time will tell about what might happen about it.

    Bet
    Bet (Hargreaves)

  6. #16
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Orlando, Florida USA
    Posts
    1,234
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bet View Post
    ... I am just waiting to see what happens about all this, the Cardiologists are having a think about it. ...
    Bet, I don't think anybody is having a think about it at all. There is no news here; nothing new to be learned. To suggest that bacteria from the mouth is causing mitral valve disease in Cavaliers -- which is referred to as "endocardiosis" -- is to ignore the past 30 years of research (at least!).
    Rod Russell

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Sale, Victoria, Australia
    Posts
    281
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Meanwhile here today is some interesting news and from this address.
    http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/health/10367883.stm

    ABC News
    Monday, 21 June 2010
    10,000 NHS patients 'to have genes mapped'
    By By Fergus Walsh

    An NHS hospital has begun decoding all the genes of individual patients, 10 years after the first human genome sequence was published.

    London's Royal Brompton Hospital said the project would give doctors a better understanding of the inherited factors that help trigger heart disease.

    The research involves sequencing all 22,000 genes found in the human genome in 10,000 patients.

    It heralds more personalised treatments for diseases.

    Genes are chunks of DNA that contain instructions for making chemicals in the body. As well as controlling things like eye and hair colour, faults in genes may make people susceptible to disease.

    The sections of DNA that make up all a person's genes are known as the exome. Although genes represent only about 1% of the entire genome, they contain most of the key information for diagnosing inherited disease and for finding targets for new treatments.

    In all 10,000 patients will have their genes sequenced at the Royal Brompton Hospital, which specialises in the treatment of heart and lung conditions, over the next 10 years.

    They will also have a detailed MRI scan of the heart to show how it is functioning. The study has been made possible because of dramatic progress in the speed of DNA sequencing.

    The research project is funded by the National Institute for Health Research, which awarded 6m over four years.

    It is headed by Professor Dudley Pennell, director of the cardiovascular magnetic resonance unit at the Royal Brompton and professor of cardiology at Imperial College London.

    He said: "Ultimately our aim is for someone to come in and have a full scan and genetic analysis, leading to a personalised therapy which will treat their particular disease."

    Professor Dame Sally Davies, director general of research and development for the Department of Health and NHS, said the project was "terribly exciting".

    She said: "Ten years after the first full sequencing of the human genome, it's now coming to patients and this will herald more individualised treatments."

    Although the research is targeting the genetic causes of cardiomyopathy, or heart muscle disease, the sequencing may reveal inherited risk factors for other conditions.

    Patients have to undergo extensive genetic counselling before their results are revealed.

    Landmark

    Ten years ago this week, Bill Clinton and Tony Blair held simultaneous press conferences in the White House and Downing Street to announce the first draft human genome had been completed.

    Scientists at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute near Cambridge did more of the sequencing than any of the 20 labs involved around the world.

    That project was billed as one of the greatest medical breakthroughs in history. It took 13 years to completely sequence the first human genome. The Sanger Institute can now sequence an entire genome in 13 hours.

    Scientists say the more patients that are screened, the more we will understand which genes are responsible for triggering disease.

    Professor Mike Stratton, director of the Sanger Institute, said it should increasingly lead to more personalised medicine.

    "The new therapies that are in development will be applicable to some people and not to others and the choice of therapies for individuals will be determined by what is present in their genome.

    "That is going to be good for patients because they will get the right drugs for them, and good for the health service as they won't be giving the wrong drugs to the wrong patients."

    The Sanger Institute is part of the 1000 Genomes Project, an international public-private consortium to build the most detailed map of human genetic variation to date.

    It has announced the completion of three pilot projects and that work has begun on building a public database containing information from the genomes of 2,500 people from 27 populations around the world.
    .

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    1,592
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    15

    Default Cavaliers AND THEIR SERIOUS PROBLEMS WITH PERIODONTAL DISEASE

    Quote Originally Posted by RodRussell View Post
    Bet, I don't think anybody is having a think about it at all. There is no news here; nothing new to be learned. To suggest that bacteria from the mouth is causing mitral valve disease in Cavaliers -- which is referred to as "endocardiosis" -- is to ignore the past 30 years of research (at least!).
    Cavaliers AND THEIR SERIOUS PROBLEMS WITH PERIODONTAL DISEASE


    Just to say Rod, that you are not up to date with your Facts, at least for here in Britain, the weather is too good to be getting into an argument with you, I know what I have said is a fact , and there is a meeting taking place this week where this subject is being discussed, maybe you are going to this meeting with the Cardiologists I don't know.

    Bet
    Bet (Hargreaves)

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Sale, Victoria, Australia
    Posts
    281
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bet View Post
    and there is a meeting taking place this week where this subject is being discussed, maybe you are going to this meeting with the Cardiologists I don't know.
    Oh a Cardiologists meeting, maybe Jeff Sampson might be attending in regards to the BVA/KC Heart Scheme which the KC may want up and running soon and particularly so before next Crufts.
    .

  10. #20
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Orlando, Florida USA
    Posts
    1,234
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bet View Post
    Just to say Rod, that you are not up to date with your Facts, at least for here in Britain, the weather is too good to be getting into an argument with you, I know what I have said is a fact , and there is a meeting taking place this week where this subject is being discussed, maybe you are going to this meeting with the Cardiologists I don't know. ...
    Well, most all of the US cardiologists met from June 9 to 12 in California at the annual ACVIM Forum, and none of them presented anything about gum bacteria affecting MVD in the breed, or even in dogs in general. I am not aware of any meetings of US cardiologists this week or the near future.
    Rod Russell

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •